Tony Lovasco's Voting Record

Vote explanations will be listed below for recorded "roll call" votes made on pertinent matters (amendments, bill passage, etc). Roll call votes on routine procedural actions such as approving the daily House journal are not generally listed. If a particular action is notable for special or unusual reasons, it may be included in this list despite falling into a category not normally documented.

Click here to view a single page with all my votes listed by date.


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03/14/19 -- HB 470 -- Requires certain occupational licenses to be granted after an apprenticeship

Bill Number: 
HB 470
Bill Purpose: 
Requires certain occupational licenses to be granted after an apprenticeship
Date of Vote: 
03/14/19
My Vote: 
Yes
Explanation: 

HB 470, introduced by Representative Derek Grier (Republican - District 100), requires licensing authorities to grant a license to any applicant that has completed the 8th grade, an approved apprenticeship program, and passed an examination.  The purpose of the bill is to provide an alternative path to mandatory education requirements to obtain certain licenses.  While I oppose most forms of occupational licensing, if we're going to have them it makes sense to offer people who have completed practical training a way to acquire a license without having to complete additional expensive and time consuming school courses.


This bill had a roll-call vote on an amendment that failed during perfection.  Read about that here.

03/14/19 -- HCS HB 466 -- Allows family members to provide some in-home care under Medicaid

Bill Number: 
HCS HB 466
Bill Purpose: 
Allows family members to provide some in-home care under Medicaid
Date of Vote: 
03/14/19
My Vote: 
Yes
Explanation: 

HCS HB 466, introduced by Representative David Wood (Republican - District 58) allows family members to provide in-home care under certain circumstances for those effected with Alzheimer's or similar conditions -- these family members would be eligible for reimbursement under Medicaid for providing those services.  This would allow people to be cared for by relatives instead of strangers, and has the potential to save money for the state as the reimbursement costs would be substantially less than if the patient was instead admitted to a inpatient nursing facility.

While this bill's usefulness and applicability is contingent on some Federal waivers being granted, it seems like a decent idea to attempt to implement.


This bill had a roll-call vote on an amendment that failed during perfection.  Read about that here.

03/14/19 -- HB 612 -- Transfers the MO State Council on the Arts to the office of the Lieutenant Governor

Bill Number: 
HB 612
Bill Purpose: 
Transfers the MO State Council on the Arts to the office of the Lieutenant Governor
Date of Vote: 
03/14/19
My Vote: 
Yes
Explanation: 

HB 612, introduced by Representative Mary Elizabeth Coleman (Republican - District 97) simply transfers control of the MO State Council on the Arts to the Lieutenant Governor's office instead of the Department of Economic Development.  I am not fully informed regarding everything the Council on the Arts does, but it doesn't seem to make sense that they be part of the Department of Economic Development.

The transfer does not create any new costs for taxpayers, and I don't particularly care who they report to.  I voted "yes" for lack of any particular reason to object.

03/14/19 -- HCS HB 730 -- Provides reimbursement of electronic motioning costs for those found not guilty

Bill Number: 
HCS HB 730
Bill Purpose: 
Provides reimbursement of electronic motioning costs for those found not guilty
Date of Vote: 
03/14/19
My Vote: 
Yes
Explanation: 

HCS HB 730, introduced by Representative Doug Ritchey (Republican - District 38) adds a 5% surcharge on the fees collected from those subjected to electronic monitoring by the courts (e.g. ankle bracelets).  This fee is then deposited in a newly created fund, the proceeds of which will be used to allow for the reimbursement of the monitoring fees paid by those later found not guilty.  There are no tax dollars involved in this fund - it is funded by the 5% surcharge and donations, if applicable.

This bill is a good idea, as currently one can be subjected to electronic monitoring as a condition of bail, and be fully on the hook for the costs associated even if you are later found to be not guilty.  An important part of criminal justice reform is to assure that those who are not guilty are not punished despite their innocence -- this bill provides for a small way to work in the right direction in that area, so I voted "yes".

03/14/19 -- HB 523 -- Increases penalties for violating the No Call List

Bill Number: 
HB 523
Bill Purpose: 
Increases penalties for violating the No Call List
Date of Vote: 
03/14/19
My Vote: 
Yes
Explanation: 

HB 523, introduced by Representative Shane Roden (Republican - District 111) increases the fines for violating the provisions of the No Call List.  It also adds a small reward for consumers who report a violation that is successfully prosecuted.  While I am usually cautious about increasing fines, it is clear that the No Call List is frequently ignored, and very few violators are actually punished.  Given that the increased penalties would only apply to knowing violations of the law, I don't have a problem increasing them in an attempt to discourage repeat offenders.  I'm also pleased with the addition of a reward for those who report violators -- currently there is no real incentive to bother to report these types of calls, so few are prosecuted. While a $100 reward isn't likely to inspire tremendous action, it will probably help a bit and is paid for by the increased fees.  Overall, this bill was acceptable enough for me to vote for.

03/14/19 -- HB 829 -- Costs regarding litigation over medical marijuana to be paid by program fees

Bill Number: 
HB 829
Bill Purpose: 
Costs regarding litigation over medical marijuana to be paid by program fees
Date of Vote: 
03/14/19
My Vote: 
Yes
Explanation: 

HB 829, introduced by Representative David Wood (Republican - District 58) simply indicates that if the state of Missouri is involved in any litigation regarding the implementation of the recently enacted medical marijuana program, any costs associated with the litigation must be paid for from the fees collected from the program, rather than general revenue or another source.  While the revenue from the program is earmarked for veteran's programs by the MO Constitution, it still seems reasonable that any costs associated with the program responsible for acquiring that revenue be deduced from that fund rather than another area.  It also seems to make sense from a budgetary perspective, as we would otherwise not need to set aside funds to cover possible lawsuits down the line.

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