Tony Lovasco's Voting Record

Vote explanations will be listed below for recorded "roll call" votes made on pertinent matters (amendments, bill passage, etc). Roll call votes on routine procedural actions such as approving the daily House journal are not generally listed. If a particular action is notable for special or unusual reasons, it may be included in this list despite falling into a category not normally documented.

Click here to view a single page with all my votes listed by date.


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03/07/19 -- HB 220 -- Shifts property tax revenue from windmills to local governments

Bill Number: 
HB 220
Bill Purpose: 
Shifts property tax revenue from windmills to local governments
Date of Vote: 
03/07/19
My Vote: 
Yes
Explanation: 

HB 220, introduced by Representative Allen Andrews (Republican - District 1) simply redirects revenue from property taxes on public utility owned wind farms to the local governments that they reside in.  Currently, such taxes are redistributed elsewhere.  While I strongly oppose property taxes of any kind, as long as we still have them we might as well be fair about how the resulting revenue is distributed.  It seems to me that keeping these taxes local is the proper course of action -- in fact I'd say as a general rule it's usually best to keep tax revenue as close to the point of collection as possible.

This bill passed by a wide margin.

03/07/19 -- HB 14 -- Supplimental appropriations for FY19

Bill Number: 
HB 14
Bill Purpose: 
Supplimental appropriations for FY19
Date of Vote: 
03/07/19
My Vote: 
Yes
Explanation: 

HB 14, introduced by budget chair Representative Cody Smith (Republican - District 163) provides supplemental appropriations for various purposes to finish out fiscal year 2019.   For the most part, the bill simply moves revenue from designated funds to the departments that had been previously authorized under the 2019 budget to make expenditures.

I don't sit on the Budget committee, so I was not privvy to the full discussion related to this bill.  As such, I cannot speak authoritatively regarding the specifics.  While I am extremely hesitant to vote "yes" on something I don't have a full understanding of, after consulting with a trusted colleague who is on the Budget committee, I had sufficient confidence that this measure was acceptable to support it.

03/07/19 -- HB 821 -- Establishes a Land Bank in St. Joseph

Bill Number: 
HB 821
Bill Purpose: 
Establishes a Land Bank in St. Joseph
Date of Vote: 
03/07/19
My Vote: 
No
Explanation: 

HB 821, introduced by Representative Sheila Solon (Republican - District 9) allows the city of St. Joseph to establish a "land bank" agency that could purchase land a tax auctions for the purpose of redevelopment or demolishment.  Proponents of the bill claim that it will allow the city to clean up unsafe and blighted areas and improve property values throughout the city.

Setting aside the fact that the bill carves out a special privilege for a particular city (a concept I don't generally care for), this is well outside the purpose of government.  It's bad enough that people are losing their property due to unpaid taxes - now they want to allow government to purchase it and via central planning determine what will be developed there?  No thanks.

There was a decent amount of opposition, but it ultimately did pass.

03/06/19 -- HCS HBs 161 and 401 -- Prohibits starting school before 14 days prior to the 1st Mon in Sept

Bill Number: 
HCS HBs 161 and 401
Bill Purpose: 
Prohibits starting school before 14 days prior to the 1st Mon in Sept
Date of Vote: 
03/06/19
My Vote: 
Yes
Explanation: 

HCS HBs 161 & 401, introduced by Representative Jeff Knight (Republican - District 129) prohibits local school districts from setting an opening date for the school term that is more than 14 calendar days prior to the first Monday in September.  This bill was one of the most contentious and polarizing issues we've debated since I've been a State Rep.  It's also an issue I have no particular opinion on. 

Personally, I really don't care when public schools start their school years.  Proponents of this bill indicated that by making sure that school years don't start too early, families will be able to take their kids to the Missouri State Fair without having to pull them out of class.  This point was cited by a constituent that contacted me in support of the bill.  None of my constituents voiced opposition to the bill, and I do think the motivation for it is reasonable.  Since there is no expansion of government, increase of taxes, or violation of individual rights at stake here, I decided that since I didn't have any preference of my own I should just vote on behalf of my constituent that favored the bill.  So I voted "yes".

It did pass, though not by a wide margin.

03/04/19 -- HCS HR 210 -- Encourages MLS to give consideration to placing an expansion team in St. Louis

Bill Number: 
HCS HR 210
Bill Purpose: 
Encourages MLS to give consideration to placing an expansion team in St. Louis
Date of Vote: 
03/04/19
My Vote: 
Yes
Explanation: 

My blanket statement on resolutions:

I do not generally feel that resolutions do much practical good.  Most of the time, they are just ignored.  That said, they can have practical value, either to make a statement on behalf of the House, or to provide guidance or advice to other government entities.  Resolutions do not cost the taxpayers any money, and are typically debated for only a short time on the House floor.  As a result, out of courtesy to the sponsor, it is my policy to generally vote yes on such measures unless special circumstances apply or I strongly disagree with the content.  Accordingly, I voted yes on this resolution.

It passed, unsurprisingly.

03/04/19 -- HCR 18 -- Urges public schools to institute JROTC in their schools

Bill Number: 
HCR 18
Bill Purpose: 
Urges public schools to institute JROTC in their schools
Date of Vote: 
03/04/19
My Vote: 
Yes
Explanation: 

I do not generally feel that resolutions do much practical good.  Most of the time, they are just ignored.  That said, they can have practical value, either to make a statement on behalf of the House, or to provide guidance or advice to other government entities.  Resolutions do not cost the taxpayers any money, and are typically debated for only a short time on the House floor.  As a result, out of courtesy to the sponsor, it is my policy to generally vote yes on such measures unless special circumstances apply or I strongly disagree with the content.  Accordingly, I voted yes on this resolution.

It passed, unsurprisingly.

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