Tony Lovasco's Voting Record

Vote explanations will be listed below for recorded "roll call" votes made on pertinent matters (amendments, bill passage, etc). Roll call votes on routine procedural actions such as approving the daily House journal are not generally listed. If a particular action is notable for special or unusual reasons, it may be included in this list despite falling into a category not normally documented.

Click here to view a single page with all my votes listed by date.


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03/27/19 -- HCS HB 677 -- Allows public funds to be expended for Enterprise Stadium

Bill Number: 
HCS HB 677
Bill Purpose: 
Allows public funds to be expended for Enterprise Stadium
Date of Vote: 
03/27/19
My Vote: 
No
Explanation: 

HCS HB 677, introduced by Representative Jon Patterson (Republican - District 30) allows the expenditure of public funds on "Enterprise Stadium" in the Kansas City area.  Apparently, proponents of the bill are attempting to attract Major League Soccer to host their World Cup series there in an economic development effort.

This is well outside the proper scope of government.  While this bill does not allow taxpayer funds to be given to MLS directly, it does allow such funds to be expended on behalf of a facility with a primary purpose that has nothing to do with government.  Entertainment, sports, and similar endeavors have nothing to do with the role of government, and it is unacceptable to spend taxpayer resources in support of them.  A project might increase revenue to a state or local government as a result of economic activity, but that doesn't justify the expenditure of tax dollars for something outside the role of government.

03/27/19 -- HCS #2 HB 451 -- Change vehicle inspection frequency requirements

Bill Number: 
HCS #2 HB 451
Bill Purpose: 
Change vehicle inspection frequency requirements
Date of Vote: 
03/27/19
My Vote: 
Yes
Explanation: 

HCS #2 HB 451, introduced by Representative J. Eggleston (Republican - District 2) changes the frequency that one must have a safety inspection performed on motor vehicles.

The original version of this bill actually eliminated the safety inspection requirement altogether.  At first glance, that sounds extreme and unreasonable -- after all, don't these inspections help keep us safe?  As it turns out, apparently not.  Missouri is one of only a handful of states that still require safety inspections (if I recall correctly, there are only six other states left).   This despite the Federal government previously required all states to perform them in the past.  Once that mandate was lifted the vast majority of states removed their requirements as well.  And did fatal accidents resulting from malfunctions drastically increase thereafter?  Nope.  Mandatory safety inspections tuned out to be nothing more than another hoop that taxpayers must jump through, accompanied by yet another fee.

Unfortunately, there was not sufficient support for the original bill as drafted, so a compromise was reached. The final version of this legislation reduced the frequency requirement of inspections rather than eliminate them entirely.  Under the new bill, one won't need to get an inspection until their vehicle reaches 10 years of age, or accrues 150,000 miles.  Not nearly as appealing as eliminating inspections entirely, however it is a good step in the right direction.

03/27/19 -- HCS HB 107 -- Establishes penalties for violating laws regarding service animals

Bill Number: 
HCS HB 107
Bill Purpose: 
Establishes penalties for violating laws regarding service animals
Date of Vote: 
03/27/19
My Vote: 
Yes
Explanation: 

HCS HB 107, introduced by Representative Chrissy Sommer (Republican - District 106) specifies that anyone that misrepresents a dog as a service dog for the purpose of receiving special accommodations is guilty of a misdemeanor and is liable for any actual damages resulting from their misrepresentation.

This is a very good bill.  The American's with Disabilities Act currently forbids businesses from asking for proof or other evidence that an animal is in fact a legitimate service animal prior to providing accommodations.  As a result, many unscrupulous people have made a habit of taking pets or other non-service animals into retail establishments and demanding special treatment that they are not entitled to under the law.  This bill won't change the ADA's prohibition regarding providing proof prior to accommodation, however it will allow authorities to prosecute any violations that are otherwise discovered or disclosed.  While I don't believe such a prosecution will happen terribly often, there mere threat of being charged with a crime will likely deter many of the more casual abuse of the ADA that occurs.

03/27/19 -- HCS HB 80 -- Prohits drug testing in private probation services when unrelated

Bill Number: 
HCS HB 80
Bill Purpose: 
Prohits drug testing in private probation services when unrelated
Date of Vote: 
03/27/19
My Vote: 
Yes
Explanation: 

HCS HB 80, introduced by Representative Justin Hill (Republican - District 108) prohibits private probation services from requiring drug or alcohol tests when such tests are unrelated to the crime the person was convicted of.  Current law allows such tests, which provide a perverse incentive for such probation services, who ultimately profit from parole violations.

This bill is an important part of criminal justice reform, as any serious effort to reform the system must include provisions to eliminate any "policing for profit" type activities.  Violating someone's probation based on unnecessary tests that have no bearing to their crime or certainly seems to fall into that category, even when the party involved is a private company.  This was a good bill that I was happy to vote for.

03/27/19 -- HB 257 -- Allows an alternative discipline option for the board of pharmacy

Bill Number: 
HB 257
Bill Purpose: 
Allows an alternative discipline option for the board of pharmacy
Date of Vote: 
03/27/19
My Vote: 
Yes
Explanation: 

HB 257, introduced by Representative Mike Stephens (Republican - District 128) allows the state Board of Pharmacy to enter into a voluntary compliance agreement with a licensee or permit holder as an alternative to harsher penalties as part of a disciplinary action.

While I'm not very familiar with the state Board of Pharmacy's discipline process, it seems reasonable that coming to an agreement with someone about how to correct their behavior should be an option rather than requiring a particular punishment automatically.

03/27/19 -- HCS HB 763 -- Exempts certain schools from the state minimum wage law

Bill Number: 
HCS HB 763
Bill Purpose: 
Exempts certain schools from the state minimum wage law
Date of Vote: 
03/27/19
My Vote: 
Yes
Explanation: 

HCS HB 763, introduced Tim Remole (Republican - District 6) exempts private schools from the minimum wage increase that was passed in November of 2018.  Currently, public schools are specifically exempted from that increase, so this bill aimed to level the playing field accordingly with private schools.

I opposed the minimum wage increase last year, and stand opposed to minimum wage laws in general. Such laws interfere with the free market, and result in lower skilled workers being priced out of employment opportunities.  It is also both unfair and unjust for the government to tell someone that they are not allowed to voluntarily work for any specified wage.  The external value of someone's labor is determined by the market, and the personal value that they place on their own labor is determined by that individual.  When those numbers reach an equilibrium in a free market, someone gets hired.  But when the government sets an artificial floor on wages, this process doesn't work properly, and many people are left unemployed.

While this bill only effects a small part of the market, and only decreases the relevant minimum wage by a small amount, it is still a move in the right direction, so I voted "yes".

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