Tony Lovasco's Voting Record

Vote explanations will be listed below for recorded "roll call" votes made on pertinent matters (amendments, bill passage, etc). Roll call votes on routine procedural actions such as approving the daily House journal are not generally listed. If a particular action is notable for special or unusual reasons, it may be included in this list despite falling into a category not normally documented.

Click here to view a single page with all my votes listed by date.


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03/27/19 -- HCS HB 472 -- Various occupational licensing reforms

Bill Number: 
HCS HB 472
Bill Purpose: 
Various occupational licensing reforms
Date of Vote: 
03/27/19
My Vote: 
Yes
Explanation: 

HCS HB 472, introduced by Representative Derek Grier (Republican - District 100) does a variety of things related to occupational licensing reform:

  • It incorporated the "Fresh Start Act" from HCS HB 564 that I wrote about previously.
  • Incorporates HB 470, which I wrote about also.
  • Slightly lowers the number of hours of training needed to obtain a cosmetology license.
  • Removes the age requirements to obtain a plumber's license.

For the same reasons that I supported HCS HB 564 and HB 470, I was pleased to vote "yes" on this bill as well.

03/27/19 -- HB 655 -- Defines the term landowners agent as it relates to feral hog mitigation

Bill Number: 
HB 655
Bill Purpose: 
Defines the term landowners agent as it relates to feral hog mitigation
Date of Vote: 
03/27/19
My Vote: 
Yes
Explanation: 

HB 655, introduced by Reprentative Chris Dinkins (Republican - District 144) is a minor cleanup bill that simply adds a definition of the term "landowner's agent" as it relates to the ability to designate someone to eliminate feral hogs on one's property.  Apparently existing law did not properly define the term, leaving it ambigious who a landowner could delegate such tasks to.

The bill defines a landowner's agent as "any person who has permission from a landowner to be present on the landowner's property".   Seems pretty straightforward to me.

03/27/19 -- HCS HB 356 -- Allows brewers to lease refridgeration units

Bill Number: 
HCS HB 356
Bill Purpose: 
Allows brewers to lease refridgeration units
Date of Vote: 
03/27/19
My Vote: 
Yes
Explanation: 

HCS HB 356, introduced by Representative Dean Plocher (Republican - District 89) is an extremely simple bill that extends a sunset on a prior statute that allows brewers to lease retail portable refrigeration units.  It also allows employees under the age of 21 to unload liquor for retail delivery when under supervision of another employee who is over 21.

I am not well versed in the industry regulations that this bill modifies, however I am at a loss to understand why either of these restrictions were put in place to begin with.  Since this bill does increase liberty, even in a very specific and small way, I voted "yes".

03/25/19 -- HB 240 -- Establishes a Joint Committee on Substance Abuse Prevention

Bill Number: 
HB 240
Bill Purpose: 
Establishes a Joint Committee on Substance Abuse Prevention
Date of Vote: 
03/25/19
My Vote: 
Yes
Explanation: 

HB 240, introduced by Represenative Nick Schroer (Republican - District 107) creates a "Joint Committee on Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment" to study possible legislative solutions to substance abuse and treatment needs.  While I am skeptical this committee will come up with ideas I am likely to support, the committee itself costs basically nothing (there's only a $3,000 budget for potential mileage reimbursements for meetings).  So in the spirit of having a discussion, I voted in favor of this bill.

03/25/19 -- HB 267 -- Allow public schools to offer an elective course on the Bible

Bill Number: 
HB 267
Bill Purpose: 
Allow public schools to offer an elective course on the Bible
Date of Vote: 
03/25/19
My Vote: 
No
Explanation: 

HB 267, introduced by Representative Ben Baker (Republican - District 160) allows public schools the option to offer an elective social studies course on the Old and/or New Testaments of the Bible.  While already authorized by existing law, this bill was filed due to some schools suggesting there was confusion regarding if they were allowed to teach the Bible as its own course versus simply using it as a teaching aid in an otherwise distinct course.

I have a lot of respect for the bill sponsor, who offered this bill in good faith (no pun intended). That said, there are some legitimate concerns regarding the Constitutionality of the bill's wording.  While the courts have previously ruled that the existing law allowing the Bible or other religious texts to be used as a teaching aid to be Constitutional, this bill's reference to a particular religious document raises some possible issues.  I am inclined to think that the courts would in fact rule in favor of this bill, however the process to adjudicate that would be costly. 

In anticipation of that objection, Representative Shamed Dogan (Republican - District 98) introduced amendment 0740H01.06H that added additional religious texts to the bill as possible subjects of elective courses.  That amendment was modified by voice vote by an amendment by Represntative Mike Moon (Republican - District 157) to essentially remove lists the additonal texts.  I voted against Representative Moon's amendment, however it passed anyway.  Once that occured, it essentially defeated the purpose of the original amendment, so Representative Dogan withdrew it.

In addition to the concerns regarding Constitutionality, I received multiple pieces of feedback from supporters encouraging me to oppose this bill on religious grounds.  The concern was that public school teachers are unlikely to be able to teach the Bible in a non-biased or fair way - as a result those who were personally particularly religious were very worried that this bill would result in kids being provided anti-religious sentiments even if intentions were good.

I was not exicted to vote against this bill, however I felt that given both the feedback I was given and the potential for extra cost to the State, it was best to do so.

03/25/19 -- HCS HB 438 -- Creates uniform qualfications for running for office

Bill Number: 
HCS HB 438
Bill Purpose: 
Creates uniform qualfications for running for office
Date of Vote: 
03/25/19
My Vote: 
Yes
Explanation: 

HCS HB 438, introduced by Representative Jason Chipman (Republican - District 120) modifies the qualifications to run for various offices such that these qualifications are uniform in nature.  It lowers the minimum age to run for various county offices/boards to 21 years of age, as well as lowers the filing fee from $50 to $25.

While this bill was unable to address the disparity in the office qualifications specified in the Missouri Constitution, it does go a long way to unify the requirements to run for other offices across Missouri.  This is a positive change that I support -- if someone is old enough to run for one office it stands to reason they would be old enough to run for a similar position.

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